geldefenderTM Blog

  • Lions player stays on field after hit to head

     

    Despite the strides the NFL and other sports’ sanctioning bodies have made in recent years, it seems that some head injuries are still brushed off as trifles to be dealt with later.

     

    When Detroit Lions offensive lineman LaAdrian Waddle banged his head on the field late in the game against the New Orleans Saints, he was not taken out of play as is the protocol for hard hits to the head. The team was aware that a concussion was a possibility, but the coaches put him in for one final play instead of having the team doctors evaluate him immediately.

     

    Granted, the play only entailed the snap and quarterback Matthew Stafford’s taking a knee to end the game, so I’ll allow that there was little chance of a second impact. But small allowances like these so soon after the protocol was implemented does not bode well for future handling of head injuries. Similar lines of logic – “just one more play before he comes out” or “the game’s almost over; we’ll check him out then” – could have much more far-reaching consequences in other circumstances. Not only is delaying diagnosis and treatment risky, but it is also downright dangerous to put an injured player back on the field and gamble that he isn’t injured a second time.

     

    So while this particular move seemed low-risk and innocent, it is the top of a slippery and alarming slope. Let’s hope the NFL and its teams don’t continue down it.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • Formula One head injury victim still in hospital

     

    Another tragic head injury has the world holding its breath this week as Formula One driver Jules Bianchi remains in “critical but stable” condition after a crash Sunday.

     

    The car the talented French 25-year-old was driving hit a tractor during the Japanese Grand Prix, and he suffered a diffuse axonal injury, a type of brain injury. His family has now arrived at the hospital in Japan where he is being treated, increasing concerns that his prognosis is bleak.

     

    Our thoughts and prayers are with him and his family as he fights for his life. We wish him a full recovery followed by a long, successful career, even as his condition reminds us of how much is at stake where our heads are concerned.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • High school football player sustains fatal head injury

     

    Another high school football player lost his life this week as a result of an on-field head injury.

     

    Tom Cutinella, a junior at Shoreham-Wading River High School, collided with a player on the opposing team during the third quarter a game on Long Island Wednesday and collapsed. He died in the hospital later that night.

     

    Tom also played lacrosse and was a member of the Natural Helpers program. Our thoughts are with his family, friends and school, and we grieve his loss with them.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • FIFA to change its concussion protocol

     

    FIFA is expected to change its head injury protocol today, allowing team doctors to stop play for the injured player to be assessed.

     

    The new policy will allow referees to stop games for three minutes for team doctors to check an injured player. The doctor will then have to give authorization before the referee will allow the player back into the game. The doctor, not the player or the coach, will have the final say as to whether he stays in the game. FIFA hopes the new measures will reinforce the role of team doctors, giving them more authority in concussion management.

     

    Following the high-profile mishandlings of concussions at the World Cup, FIFA has been under enormous pressure to regulate how teams respond to head injuries on the field. In response, a proposal for rule changes was to be brought before the executive committee to be confirmed this week. The two-day meeting began yesterday, so the final decision should be announced soon.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • Study: Xenon gas treatment could reduce effect of brain injuries

     

    Xenon gas may be able to reduce brain damage after head injuries, according to a new study. Since there are currently no drugs that can be given after a concussion to lessen its impact, this could be a great breakthrough in head injury treatment.

     

    Researchers at Imperial College in London have discovered that in mice, xenon gas given within the first three hours of a brain impact limits brain damage in the short and long term. The mice treated performed better in neurological tests both in the days after injury and after one month. The effect had been observed in mechanical injuries in the lab, but this was the first time it had been shown in live animals.

     

    The promising results could lead to clinical trials for using xenon gas to treat human head injuries. If successful, this could be a huge step forward in caring for concussions in the future.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • New NFL season arrives and with it, new concussions

    ­

     

    With Week 1 of the new NFL season wrapped up and Week 2 barely begun, this year’s round of head injuries in professional football has commenced. Before the games even began, 10 players were on the  disabled list with concussions, and several more have been sustained during play, including Bengals Linebacker Vontaze Burfict and Jags safety Jonathan Cyprien.

     

    Though the handling of head injuries across football has improved greatly recently, we still have a long way to go in discovering how best to prevent, diagnose and treat them. Millions of dollars is being spent on research to better understand these injuries that seem an epidemic in not only football but in athletics as a whole as well.

     

    Over the past three years, the NFL has averaged 247 concussions per season. With improved awareness and further research, let’s hope that number will be dramatically lower three years from now.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • Play it safer this fall season

     

    The much-dreaded return to the classroom has arrived for students everywhere, but with it also comes the much-anticipated fall sports season.

     

    Given the amount of literature about sports head injuries generated and circulated recently, we are not going to add another detailed explanation of the risks into the fray. But as the kids you care about head back onto the field, we’d be remiss not to remind you to take care of their brains.

     

    Remember, a hard hit to the head is not just getting your bell rung, and shaking it off or powering through is not something to be congratulated. Make sure the student-athletes you know and their coaches are educated about the short- and long-term dangers of head injury and follow safe protocols.

     

    Good equipment, correct on-field techniques and swift identification and treatment of concussions all play a big part in keeping athletes safe. If players and coaches are proactive in taking care of athletes’ brains, then kids can play it safer.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • Lab grows brain tissue, opens doors for concussion reseach

     

    In a huge leap forward for head injury research, brain tissue has, for the first time, been successfully grown in a lab.

     

    The new 3D tissue functions chemically and electrically like a real brain and can survive for up to two months in a lab. Until now, scientists have only been able to research with 2D neurons instead of with the complex structure of grey and white matter that the new tissue replicates. In addition to head injury research, the advancement could also shed light on other matters such as dementia, drug screening, and nutrition.

     

    Now, scientists are able to mimic brain injuries by dropping weights onto the synthetic brains, and they are hopeful that this will be enable them to better track how the brain responds to and recovers from concussion. Consequently, they may be able to find ways to repair the damaged areas.

     

    Of course, this is still mostly speculation, and only time will tell how much or little enlightenment this brain tissue will yield, but it certainly is a significant step forward and has the potential to be a brain injury game-changer.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • Premier League to implement new head injury rules

     

    The English Premier League, England’s primary professional soccer competition (as the name implies), is introducing new rules on how to deal with head injuries.

     

    Starting with the 2014-15 season, any player with a head injury must leave the pitch, and a club doctor, not management or the coaching staff, must make the decision on whether a player can return to play. And for each game, the home team must employ a “tunnel” doctor who will monitor the action for potential concussions and provide support for the club doctors.

     

    In addition, a campaign to educate players and managers about the dangers of concussions will be launched, a doctor dedicated to head injury research who liaises with each club will be hired, and annual baseline testing of all players will be conducted.

     

    Several high-profile mishandlings of soccer concussions in the last year have been driving forces in the changes. In addition to several World Cup blunders, a head injury last season within the league has mounted pressure for reform: Keeper Hugo Lloris lost conscious during a match yet was allowed to continue playing for the rest of the game.

     

    Now, the League is taking important steps to improve how they handle such situations and prevent such dangerous situations. With any luck, this will mark the beginning of a trend toward better head safety in professional soccer as a whole.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

  • New California bill limits full-contact practices for middle and high schools

     

    California has joined a number of other states in limiting the number of full-contact practices in middle and high schools.

     

    Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law that will prohibit full-contact practices in the off-season and only allow two 90-minute ones per week in the preseason and regular season. The bill also establishes a 7-day supervised protocol that athletes will be required to complete after a head injury. The law, which will apply to all public, private and charter schools, will go into effect in 2015.

     

    By and large, the response to the new measures seems to have been a positive one. A number of major medical and educational bodies have voice their support for the bill, which comes as no surprise given that the Sports Legacy Institute estimates that more than half of football brain trauma occurs in practice. This measure could go a long way in limiting those head injuries, not only the major concussions but also the small, repeated blows that add up over time.

     

    Though of course not everybody is thrilled with the new regulations, it’s encouraging that more lawmakers are recognizing and reacting to the need to protect kids’ heads. Perhaps more will now follow in the wake of these states who have already stepped up.

     

    *Scientists have no conclusive evidence as to whether or how the reduction of g-forces during impacts reduces the number or degree of concussions and head injuries. GelDefender products provide supplemental padding as well as cooling and comfort benefits when used with helmets and caps. Participants in activities in which head impacts can occur should always use tested and approved helmets for protection. However, no helmet or supplemental padding can protect the user from all serious head or neck injuries that can result from impacts.

Items 1 to 10 of 75 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. ...
  7. 8